About Parker

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Parker studies changes in the climate system, mechanisms for deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, and the commercial viability of low-carbon energy technologies. He is currently Earth Systems Advisor at the Advanced Research Projects Agency -- Energy (ARPA-E) in the Department of Energy, where he works primarily on mechanisms to enhance carbon sequestration through biogeochemical pathways.

Previously, Parker was Policy Advisor for Natural Resources at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). At OSTP, he led a portfolio focused on domestic environmental, energy, agricultural, and life sciences. In this role, he co-led several interagency scientific bodies under the National Science and Technology Council, including as Co-Chair of the Subcommittee on Life Sciences and the Subcommittee on Food and Agriculture.

Parker has led expeditions in the Arctic and Antarctic. In 2013, after three expeditions to the North Pole, Parker led the Willis Resilience Expedition, a climate change research expedition across Antarctica that broke the record for the fastest human-powered trek to the South Pole. He also became the youngest man to walk to the Pole at the time.

In December 2013, Parker was named to TIME Magazine’s 30 Under 30 list of people changing the world. He studied Geology & Geophysics at Yale University.

Research Interests

Parker's research interests include biogeochemistry of the global carbon cycle, stable isotope geochemistry, applied statistics for climate-change impacts, and adoption pathways for low-carbon energy technologies.

Parker discusses climate change with former U.S. Vice President Al Gore at the 2013 UN Foundation Social Good Summit. 

Parker discusses climate change with former U.S. Vice President Al Gore at the 2013 UN Foundation Social Good Summit.